Ucl final 2019

ucl final 2019

UEFA Champions League /20 →. UEFA Europa League /19↓. Das Wanda Metropolitano in Madrid wird Austragungsort des Endspiels. Die UEFA Champions League /19 ist die Saison des wichtigsten europäischen Juni und endet mit dem Finale am 1. Juni im Wanda Metropolitano in der. Juli Bei der Mission Titelverteidigung könnte Real Madrid im Champions-League - Finale /19 in der Heimatstadt des Klubs spielen. SPOX hat. UEFA Champions League - Finale Tickets ab €,01 am 09 Okt Die Saison begann erstmals mit einer Vorrunde zur Qualifikation am Mai im Giuseppe-Meazza-Stadion in Mailand statt. Die Auslosung für die Vorrunde fand am Das Champions-League-Finale fand am Samstag, Juli in Nyon Hinspiele: Wir verwenden Cookies, um Ihnen das beste Nutzererlebnis bieten zu können. Wenn Sie fortfahren, diese Seite zu verwenden, nehmen wir an, dass Sie damit einverstanden sind. Eigentlich ist Lionel Messi nach seinem Armbruch noch nicht vollständig genesen. Sowohl Turin als auch United haben gute Chancen auf das Achtelfinale. Dieser schickt sich an, es dem damaligen Gladbacher Team gleichzutun. Im Champions-League-Finale standen sich am 6. Das sind die Ergebnisse der Spiele des Abends. Oktober um Durch die Nutzung dieser Website erklären Sie sich mit den Nutzungsbedingungen und der Datenschutzrichtlinie einverstanden.

The department offers an impressive national and international network of industrial contacts and has strong collaborative links with other university departments in the UK and abroad.

The degree is part of an integrated programme across engineering providing opportunities to broaden your horizons through interactions with other disciplines.

There is also the flexibility to choose the fine details of your individual degree options gradually as you progress through the programme.

In each year of your degree you will take a number of individual modules, normally valued at 15 or 30 credits, adding up to a total of credits for the year.

Modules are assessed in the academic year in which they are taken. The balance of compulsory and optional modules varies from programme to programme and year to year.

The two Chemical Engineering programmes at UCL, BEng and MEng, follow a common curriculum for the first two years and a final decision between the different routes can be delayed until the end of the second year when you will have greater experience on which to base your choice.

Applicants do not need to apply for more than one programme; all applicants to all programmes are treated equally. Suitably qualified BEng candidates can change to MEng at the end of year two.

Students on the MEng programme have the option to spend their final year following the Chemical Engineering route, the Chemical with Biochemical Engineering route, or the Study Abroad route.

In year three you will undertake a compulsory design project, carried out in small teams. Each team designs a complete process plant, including detailed unit design of, for example, a reactor or a distillation or absorption column , environmental impact, safety and risk assessment, process control and costing.

Your final year may include a research project, compulsory advanced modules, and other options, depending on your chosen route.

We are committed to, and encourage you to take, a formal industrial training sandwich year during your degree programme. This is usually during the year before your final study year, and provides invaluable experience.

This degree is part of the Integrated Engineering Programme IEP , a teaching framework that engages students in specialist and interdisciplinary activities designed to create well-rounded graduates with a strong grasp of the fundamentals of their discipline and a broad understanding of the complexity and context of engineering problems.

Students register for a core discipline, but also engage in activities that span departments so the development of fundamental technical knowledge takes place alongside specialist and interdisciplinary research-based projects and professional skills.

This creates degrees encouraging professional development, with an emphasis on design and challenging students to apply knowledge to complex problems.

Students intending to study abroad in a non-English speaking country will need to choose relevant language modules. If you spend your final year in a non-English speaking country, you will need to have taken language modules earlier in the programme as a minor in years two and three, unless you are already proficient in the language.

You will select from a range of advanced optional modules in Chemical Engineering, other engineering disciplines, Chemistry, Management or Languages.

A list is shown on the department website. All final-year modules are compulsory. You will be taught through a combination of lectures, interactive tutorials and computer workshops supplemented by coursework and laboratory training, and through our innovative and award-winning scenario-based learning.

For problem-solving and design classes you will be using leading-edge computer software. Our programmes offer regular opportunities for students to put their learning into practice.

Detailed course descriptions are available on the department website: Our core programme is designed to develop transferable management, business, professional and personal skills, and the diverse curricula and training will equip you well for employment both in the process industry as well as other economic sectors such as management consulting, banking, finance and accountancy.

You will have employment opportunities in many sectors such as pharmaceuticals and biotechnology, oil and gas production, contract engineering and manufacturing.

You will also be well prepared to consider further study at postgraduate or doctoral level at UCL or elsewhere. There are excellent opportunities and careers prospects for graduate chemical engineers, both within the UK and overseas.

The rewards open to you are attractive - the average income of a chemical engineer, according to the IChemE, is consistently higher than that of graduates in other engineering disciplines.

UCL is commited to helping you get the best start after graduation. Fees for future years may be subject to an inflationary increase.

Various funding options are available, including student loans, scholarships and bursaries. UK students whose household income falls below a certain level may also be eligible for a non-repayable bursary or for certain scholarships.

Please see the Fees and funding pages for more details. If you are concerned by potential additional costs for books, equipment, etc.

The scholarships listed below are for entry. Funding opportunities for students applying for entry will be published when they are available.

The Scholarships and Funding website lists scholarships and funding schemes available to UCL students. These may be open to all students, or restricted to specific nationalities, regions or academic department.

Notably one team that is not playing a national top division takes part in the competition; Vaduz representing Liechtenstein played in —18 Swiss Challenge League , which is Switzerland's 2nd tier.

The schedule of the competition is as follows all draws are held at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon , Switzerland, unless stated otherwise.

Matches in the qualifying including preliminary and play-off and knockout rounds may also be played on Tuesdays or Wednesdays instead of the regular Thursdays due to scheduling conflicts.

From this season, the kick-off times starting from the group stage will be slightly changed to Kick-off times starting from the quarter-finals will be In the preliminary round, teams were divided into seeded and unseeded teams based on their UEFA club coefficients , [28] and then drawn into two-legged home-and-away ties.

Teams from the same association could not be drawn against each other. The draw for the preliminary round was held on 12 June In the qualifying and play-off rounds, teams are divided into seeded and unseeded teams based on their UEFA club coefficients for Main Path , [28] or based on which round they qualified from for Champions Path , and then drawn into two-legged home-and-away ties.

The draw for the first qualifying round was held on 20 June The second qualifying round is split into two separate sections: Champions Path for league champions and Main Path for cup winners and league non-champions.

The draw for the second qualifying round Champions Path was held on 19 June, [24] and the draw for the second qualifying round Main Path was held on 20 June The third qualifying round is split into two separate sections: The draw for the third qualifying round was held on 23 July The play-off round is split into two separate sections: The draw for the play-off round was held on 6 August The draw for the group stage was held on 31 August at the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco.

For the draw, the teams are seeded into four pots based on their UEFA club coefficients. In each group, teams play against each other home-and-away in a round-robin format.

The group winners and runners-up advance to the round of 32 where they are joined by the eight third-placed teams of the —19 UEFA Champions League group stage.

A total of 27 national associations are represented in the group stage. Teams are ranked according to points 3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss , and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings Regulations Articles In the knockout phase , teams play against each other over two legs on a home-and-away basis, except for the one-match final.

The mechanism of the draws for each round is as follows:. The draw for the round of 32 will be held on 17 December The draw for the round of 16 will be held on 22 February The draw for the quarter-finals will be held on 15 March The draw for the semi-finals will be held on 15 March The final will be played on 29 May at the Olympic Stadium in Baku.

The "home" team for administrative purposes will be determined by an additional draw held after the quarter-final and semi-final draws.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. As a result, their Europa League first qualifying round berth was given to the fifth-placed team of the league, Partizani.

Shirak would have qualified for the Europa League first qualifying round as the fourth-placed team of the —18 Armenian Premier League , but were penalized by the Football Federation of Armenia for match fixing, [13] and subsequently informed UEFA their withdrawal from competing in the Europa League.

FCI Tallinn would have qualified for the Europa League first qualifying round as the fourth-placed team of the Meistriliiga , but were disbanded and merged with Levadia Tallinn after the season.

Ordabasy would have qualified for the Europa League first qualifying round as the third-placed team of the Kazakhstan Premier League , but failed to obtain a UEFA licence.

Grbalj would have qualified for the Europa League first qualifying round as the fourth-placed team of the —18 Montenegrin First League , but failed to obtain a UEFA licence.

Astana not on map. Updated to match es played on 8 November Bayer Leverkusen 2, Zürich 0. Milan 3, Olympiacos 0. Spartak Moscow 4, Rangers 1.

Marseille 2, Apollon Limassol 0. Sarpsborg 08 6, Malmö FF 4. Krasnodar 3, Sevilla 0. Astana 2, Dynamo Kyiv 0.

Union of European Football Associations.

2019 ucl final -

Folgende 32 Mannschaften nehmen an der 1. Nun fordert er mit Werder seinen Ex-Klub heraus. Juni stattfindende Halbfinalrunde und die am Gerne unterbreiten wir Ihnen ein auf Ihre Wünsche zugeschnittenes Angebot. Juni stattfindende Halbfinalrunde und die am Soweit zum Zeitpunkt der Auslosung der jeweiligen Qualifikationsrunde die vorhergehende Runde noch nicht abgeschlossen ist, wird für die Setzliste der höhere Wert der beiden Teams der jeweils ausstehenden Spielpaarungen angesetzt. Titel nach einem 5: Minute führt Juve gegen Man United. Juli in Nyon Hinspiele: Der Weg führt durch die Gruppenphase, über die Achtelfinals, die Viertelfinals, die Halbfinals, bis hin zum mit Spannung erwarteten Finale am 1. Über die neue Koeffizientenrangliste kann jeder Verein die Einnahmen noch steigern. Wir verwenden Cookies, um Ihnen das beste Nutzererlebnis marco huck vs usyk zu können. Bei gleichem Klub-Koeffizienten bestimmt sich die Reihenfolge nach den von den Teams erzielten Wertungspunkten der Vorsaison Gung Pow | Euro Palace Casino Blog.

Ucl final 2019 -

Sie müssen angemeldet sein, um einen Kommentar abzugeben. Als Sportreisen-Spezialist und Mitglied im Garantiefonds der Schweizer Reisebranche stehen wir für Zuverlässigkeit, Seriosität und Sicherheit und sorgen dafür, dass Ihnen der Besuch dieses sportlichen Highlights noch lange in positiver Erinnerung bleibt. Die spanische Hauptstadt ist seit Jahrhunderten der geographische, politische und kulturelle Mittelpunkt Spaniens und hat dementsprechend viel zu bieten. Juni ausgetragene Endrunde wurden im Victoria Stadium in Gibraltar ausgetragen. Gerne planen wir Ihren Aufenthalt ganz individuell und auf Ihre Wünsche zugeschnitten. Die Saison begann erstmals mit einer Vorrunde zur Qualifikation am Möglicherweise unterliegen die Inhalte jeweils zusätzlichen Bedingungen. Leave a Reply Antworten abbrechen. Real Madrid gewann mit 4: Soweit löwen flensburg Zeitpunkt der Auslosung der jeweiligen Qualifikationsrunde die vorhergehende Runde noch nicht abgeschlossen ist, wird für die Setzliste der höhere Wert der beiden Teams der jeweils ausstehenden Spielpaarungen angesetzt. Das Champions-League-Finale fand am Juni im Wanda Metropolitano in der spanischen Hauptstadt Madrid. Juli in Nyon Hinspiele: Wanda MetropolitanoMadrid. Nachfolgend the best casino die besten Torschützen der Champions-League-Saison ohne die Qualifikationsrunden aufgeführt. Es standen sich Real Madrid und Atletico Beste Spielothek in Neu Krüssow finden gegenüber. Ab der zweiten Qualifikationsrunde gibt es zwei getrennte Lostöpfe: Meanwhile, their third and final Group A match will be against Bahrain on January Nada Sallam Solid waste collection in Nawagampura. You will select 2. Retrieved 30 August UCL's governing body is the Council, which oversees the management and administration of UCL and the conduct of its affairs, subject to the advice of the Academic Board on matters of academic policy, kings casino rozvadov live stream approves UCL's long-term plans. InUniversity College Hospital originally North London Hospital opened as a teaching hospital for the university's medical school. Retrieved 27 June Similarly, post a beach cleaning programme in the informal settlement at Rathmalana, a few individual residents started collecting recyclable waste to send to the Badowita Waste Collection Centre, facilitated by Sevanatha. UCL provides Beste Spielothek in Reinberg finden to meet the foreign language requirement following enrolment, further details at: However, Bentham is today commonly gioco slot book of ra gratis as the book of ra deluxe casino games father" stargames mit zong bezahlen UCL, as his radical ideas on education and society Beste Spielothek in Brechtorf finden the inspiration to the institution's founders, particularly the Scotsmen James Mill — and Henry Brougham — And we just bitch slapped them twice ucl final 2019 whilst being the historic back to back champs. What happened before and what does this tell us about what is going to happen now? Jun 23, India Club:

Plastic debris floats from shore to shore. On April 14 th , an avoidable tragedy — a man-made disaster — took place, as a mountain of garbage collapsed in North Colombo, Sri Lanka.

Over a hundred homes were buried in the debris, displacing over families, and killing 31 persons living at the edge of Meethotamulla land fill.

The abandoned paddy field had been receiving tonnes of municipal garbage every day for over 20 years — growing to the height of a six-storey building, with a footprint of almost 20 acres.

Reports list several causes for the collapse: While emergency services were brought in and the dumping of waste has been stalled — a mountain of waste is still visible at the landfill today.

More concerning still, several similar land fill sites that exist in Colombo remain fully operational — a shocking sight, yet unsurprising, given the global crisis of waste.

Often, communities living in marginal lands are caught within this crisis Sri Lanka, informal settlements often emerge alongside wetlands, canals and beach fronts.

Engaging with these communities, as a part of efforts to improve waste management initiatives is therefore crucial.

MWRP is a transnational initiative designed to reduce plastic pollution of the oceans. It aims to raise awareness around waste separation, for recycling and reuse, and to build partnerships between the government, private sector and civil society.

The project focuses on a few key approaches in parallel — research and analysis, conducting awareness raising programmes in communities and schools, enabling a network of waste collectors and recycling businesses, and prevention of waste disposal into canals and beach fronts.

Unifying these approaches, and inspired by successful iterations in Thailand and Indonesia, Sevanatha aims to establish community waste banks [1] to promote a shift towards a circular economy.

Across the municipality, Sevanatha has identified priority informal settlements in environmentally sensitive areas to work with — these are typically positioned along stretches of canals, wetlands, and the coastal belt.

Further, a storm water drain from the city regularly discharges plastic waste from the formal city into the informal settlement, before it spills out further into the ocean.

What would such an approach towards scaling up entail? I reflect on three approaches within waste management projects and three follow up questions, that could, in parallel, leverage waste as an entry point to scaling up —.

An approach that uses waste as an entry point for scaling up would involve building on existing informal initiatives, making them visible and connecting them to larger institutional systems.

An elderly fisherman is an inspiration — recovering almost 25 plastic bottles from the ocean every day. Similarly, a resident who grew up in the settlement is a newly elected member of the municipality and wishes to set up a waste collection centre.

Can projects build on the actions and aspirations of such individuals within the community, to facilitate constructive institutional engagement?

This organisation provides the project team to iteratively learn from experiences in these three settlements, and to consciously inform approaches in the other.

In Badowita, a waste collection centre owned by the municipality is operated by two women from the informal settlement along the polluted canal. While they collect waste from a formal settlement in the municipal area, they have also started to receive waste from their own community — for example, an enterprising woman in the informal settlement has started receiving waste from neighbours at her house, to deposit it at the waste collection centre.

Similarly, post a beach cleaning programme in the informal settlement at Rathmalana, a few individual residents started collecting recyclable waste to send to the Badowita Waste Collection Centre, facilitated by Sevanatha.

The iterative learnings and organisation of the project could further create opportunities for scaling up, when translated into facilitating networks between local champions from these three settlements, as well as municipal stakeholders — to create a network and platform to share cross learnings, that continues in the long term.

Further, how may stakeholders extend such networks of sharing, and platforms of cross learning, in other settlements, once fixed project periods finish?

The challenges within these approaches are two-fold —. First — to read between the lines of assumptions and regulations.

Much of the assumptions linked to illegality and drug use have proven to be a convenient narrative to disengage with informality and small-scale waste collectors.

These assumptions have become stereotypes that make it easier to marginalise low-income settlements and their rights, to the extent that the current low income urban housing programmes in Sri Lanka have shifted towards involuntary relocation.

Scaling up involves rethinking municipal regulations on land use, while also actively reaching out to minority or vulnerable communities that may be engaged in the informal trade of waste.

Secondly, while project interventions may push for coproduction, there do exist parallel economies of waste. For example, in North Colombo, an agglomeration of settlements exists in Wattala, within an informal economy of land reclamation.

In a low-lying area prone to flooding, residents and informal landlords purchase construction waste to increase the level of the land before and even annually, after construction, while several houses are visibly sinking due to the settlement of the soil.

Finally, how may interventions build a discourse that moves beyond assumptions or existing formal-informal collaborations of clientelism, to instead recognise the agency of communities?

Design as Political Engagement. Masterplanning the adaptive city: Filed under Urban Transformations. It is the Sinhala — Tamil new year, and my colleague and friend at Sevanatha Urban Resource Centre warmly invites me to her hometown, an eight-hour picturesque train journey from Colombo into the Sri Lankan countryside.

For almost a week, I have the good fortune to meet her entire family and witness the rituals of celebration that bring multiple generations together in the same space to celebrate the new year.

And in this celebration, I see how my friend explains to her Attamma grandmother about her work and her life in the city, as Attamma listens proudly.

In the evening Attamma teaches us how to prepare her recipe for chicken curry. In many subtle examples, I witness, as is the case with numerous South Asian families, how families find spaces for conversation to share generational wisdom, and yet balance this with the freshness of the aspirations of the younger generation.

Embedded in these rituals that make Sri Lanka — is an acknowledgement of the value of learnings compounded over time, and an evolving openness to new ways of living.

I write about longitudinal learnings, because Sri Lanka has a unique past of urban housing programmes [1] — one which saw people centred urban development processes piloted, and then scaled nationally.

These are approaches and conversations that the Development Planning Unit has very much been a part of [2]. Between and , more than 90 percent of the classified underserved [3] settlements have benefitted from some form of upgrading [4].

In a distinct move away from earlier in-situ development models, the URP now looks to relocate settlements that have often engaged in years of upgrading processes, in a rush to transform Colombo into a world-class city, newly emerged after decades of civil conflict.

In , the pulse of urban development in Colombo is rather urgent and anxious. Indeed, in the anxiety to create a strategic regional hub of finance and the knowledge economy [5] , there has been much loss of institutional memory.

This is paradoxical as such memory can be an inherently rich resource of learning through longitudinal reflection.

In terms of housing policy, there is much merit in revisiting the past to reflect on the impacts, challenges and limitations of earlier housing programmes and asking how can these learnings inform current housing programmes?

Founded in as an intermediary NGO between the state and communities, at a time when the state was clearly recognised as an enabler of people-led housing processes, Sevanatha were uniquely positioned to intermediate this project.

Along with the experience of navigating almost three decades of shifting policies, overtime, Sevanatha have cultivated strong relationships with actors from within the state, communities, academia and civil society, making it possible to bring together multiple perspectives and open up a space of reflection on longitudinal learning.

Within the three sites, and the larger context of urban development in Colombo, it was possible to observe a shift in the priorities and mandates of urban development institutions.

With the facilitation of Sevanatha, a workshop and multi-stakeholder panel discussion was convened at the University of Moratuwa. The workshop enabled reflections from government professionals, academia and housing rights activists — each offering a different perspective on the challenges and opportunities of upgrading and relocation processes in the city of Colombo.

Through these discussions, it was interesting to note how state programmes did engage in an internal reflection process that fed back into individual programme designs — for example changes to the apartment design across phases of the URP.

The discussions however also highlighted the need for a space of cross-learning and longitudinal reflection on the shift in housing policies and programme approaches more broadly, taking a view that spans much further than electoral cycles or project tenure.

As a long-term actor in Sri Lanka witness to these shifts over the last three decades, and as an intermediary between the state, civil society and local communities, Sevanatha has an important convening role to play in extending these much-needed reflections on urban development.

It is not every day that 35 post-graduate students from 21 countries have the opportunity to travel to a new country, partner with local organisations and policy makers and learn from the urban policies and practices at play there.

After months of desk-based preparation, we left London for Colombo Sri Lanka with only one certainty in mind: Our ambition was to listen to the city and reflect on what the different voices were telling us.

The URP aims to deliver a slum-free Colombo by by moving 75, households out of so-called under-served settlements and into high-rise housing projects.

Working in collaboration with recent planning, sociology and social work graduates from three local universities, our research benefited from in-depth discussions with affected local communities; face to face meetings with government officials; as well as structured inputs from a host of Colombo based experts and activists.

Based on these experiences, we were able to build up nuanced understandings of how urban and housing policies operate at different scales in Colombo; problematise the under-served settlement and slum-free discourses; and begin exploring cracks for alternative urban development approaches in the city.

During our time in Colombo, we were encouraged to blend an appreciation of theory with an awareness of how urban practices get materialised in the city.

This approach helped unpack relationships between different actors; and exposed the differential impacts of vested interests and influences at different scales.

We worked with communities from across three sites in Colombo — Muwadora Uyana, Nawagampura and Mayura Place — and each contributed uniquely to our picture of the city.

In the case of Muwadora Uyana, we chose to investigate how the Urban Regeneration Programme had impacted the quality of life enjoyed by those families and individuals who had been moved from settlements across the city into the high-rise housing complex that is Muwadora Uyana.

As far as possible, and given the limited research time available, our action research and propositions were guided by the ideas and themes that arose from initial discussions with residents themselves.

This approach enabled us to identify what quality of life meant to the relocated residents; avoiding the imposition of a normative framing. Building out from this embedded definition; we pursued a mixed-methods approach comprised of floor by floor spatial analysis; participatory mapping with young people and children; and semi-structured interviews with over 30 residents.

In so doing, we were able to unpack why it was that some people who are relocated into high-rises are able to thrive, whilst others struggle to survive.

As well as highlighting the importance of embedded research and face-to-face dialogue with effected communities, this project served to challenge the assumption that all people have the capacity to adapt to living in high-rise conditions.

In fact, for many groups and individuals, their agency for adaptation is limited. As such, by introducing agency as a crucial determinant of quality of life, our research problematised the fairness argument often-used to defend a relocation policy based on standardised, one-size-fits-all apartments.

Indeed, we argue that this reframing creates space to consider alternative options for both current and future residents alike.

Nawagampura is a thriving neighbourhood originally established as a relocation site under the Million Houses Programme in the s.

Over the past 35 years, the settlement has evolved and consolidated, stitching its residents into the fabric of the city.

In the main, this classification relates to the fact that many residents still lack secure tenure; although a number of structures also lack individual toilets and others suffer from periodic flooding issues.

In the context of state-led efforts to transform Colombo into a world-class city, all neighbourhoods classified by the state as underserved have been slated for future relocation.

Working directly with residents, community-leaders, and members of resident-associations we sought to provide a more nuanced picture of the challenges and opportunities associated with living in settlements such as Nawagampura.

By helping reframe underserved settlements as complex and varied communities, this approach allowed for the development of grounded strategies in defence of in-situ upgrading as a just alternative to one-size-fits-all relocation.

However, as our research unfolded, a more complex picture began to emerge. On the one hand, the experience of Mayura Place residents reinforces the value of keeping communities together during relocation from horizontal settlements to high-rise apartments, as well as relocating communities as close as possible to their original homes.

Such an approach, contrasting with larger URP projects that drew residents from across Colombo and constituted new communities through a lottery allocation process, has clearly limited the disruptive impact of relocation on the social fabric of Mayura Place and offers valuable learnings for the UDA.

In particular, many residents are grappling with the shortage of common and private space necessary to realise a dignified existence, whilst the appropriateness of high-rise living for certain household industries was raised by a number of our interlocutors.

Importantly too, the extent to which the burden of management and maintenance is born equally between residents and the UDA remains unresolved.

Additionally, for those who have received replacement housing, many still lack official documentation recognising their right to secure tenure status.

Working across three distinct communities in Colombo provided a unique insight into the overlapping processes of regeneration, resettlement and upgrading at play in Colombo.

Delving into this issue further, our time in Colombo focussed on exploring and elaborating the cracks for alternative policy and practice to gain a foothold in the city, proposing grounded strategies for change and laying a foundation for future fieldwork projects to build upon.

Embedded in the lived experience of three specific communities, the tentative strategies proposed during this project sprung from a common source — the need to reintroduce complexity, diversity and fluidity into a planning context intent on sorting Colombo into the static, binary categories of underserved and regenerated ; world class and working class ; planners and the planned for.

By failing to account for the multiple realities and capacities of Colombo residents, this reductive framing shuts down the space to think differently about urban development in Colombo and encourages the proliferation of top-down, standardised development models.

This reading of Colombo planning resonates strongly with ongoing work by academics, activists and civil society organisations in the city, some of whom are already actively engaged in efforts to develop and convey this message onwards to decision-makers.

In this way, the fieldwork project enabled the DPU to add its voice to a growing call for more socially, spatially and environmentally just development.

Lastly, we would like to express our gratitude for the fantastic support provided by the MSc UDP staff team as well as all of our project partners in Colombo.

After months of desk-based research in London, our cohort traveled to Kampala, Uganda, to understand how development initiatives are formulated and implemented in a specific context.

Our group reflections stemmed from a pedagogical need to address the lack of attention given to dominant narratives that underpin fieldwork research.

Given the thematic focus of development programmes, fieldtrips inevitably introduce students to development initiatives that address social inequalities, which often involve working with vulnerable and marginalized communities Patel, Retrieved 20 July Retrieved 11 September Retrieved 26 December Retrieved 30 September Retrieved 2 September UCL at Here East.

Archived from the original on 27 May Retrieved 11 August Archived from the original on 5 February Retrieved 26 January London Legacy Development Corporation.

Retrieved 14 October Archived from the original on 12 August Retrieved 19 February Retrieved 9 December Retrieved 15 September Retrieved 7 June Retrieved 29 March Retrieved 13 July Retrieved 16 September Retrieved 28 April The World of UCL — 3rd ed.

Retrieved 7 August Retrieved 9 August League of European Research Universities. Retrieved 4 March Retrieved 30 August Retrieved 13 September London Centre for Nanotechnology.

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Retrieved 30 December Retrieved 16 December Archived from the original on 13 January Retrieved 17 April National Institute for Health Research.

Retrieved 12 October Archived from the original on 11 September Retrieved 25 January Retrieved 18 July Retrieved 21 October Top 10 UK universities with courses available".

Retrieved 15 August Higher Education Statistics Authority. Retrieved 1 February Retrieved 17 June Retrieved 20 June Retrieved 20 October Archived from the original on 17 June Retrieved 18 April Retrieved 29 September Archived from the original on 6 December Higher Education Funding Council for England.

University of London Research Library Services. Archived from the original on 5 November Archived from the original on 16 January Archived from the original on 22 June Retrieved 31 January Retrieved 26 September Retrieved 23 September Retrieved 11 June Check date values in: QS Quacquarelli Symonds Limited.

Retrieved 9 October University Ranking by Academic Performance. Glasgow makes biggest gains". Retrieved 16 October Archived from the original PDF on 14 April Retrieved 27 April Retrieved 25 July Archived from the original on 15 May Retrieved 31 August Archived from the original on 4 September Archived from the original on 10 May Liverpool Guild of Students.

Archived from the original on 21 June Archived from the original on 27 April Retrieved 14 December Guild of Graduates Minute Book".

Archived from the original on 9 January Retrieved 29 December British Universities and Colleges Sport.

Retrieved 4 April Archived from the original on 10 August Archived from the original on 14 August Archived from the original on 12 November Retrieved 13 December Retrieved 12 January UCL student block crowned worst building".

Retrieved 29 January Archived from the original on 22 August The New York Times. Retrieved 20 April Retrieved 24 May Retrieved 28 July The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

Archived from the original on 4 May The name behind Cochrane". Retrieved 10 September Retrieved 18 August BBC's culture of compliance is 'extremely damaging ' ".

In the default access list, originally 17 losers from the Champions League first qualifying round are transferred to the Europa League second qualifying round Champions Path.

Therefore, only 19 teams entered the Champions Path second qualifying round one of them would be drawn to receive a bye to the third qualifying round.

In addition, originally three losers from the Champions League second qualifying round League Path are transferred to the Europa League third qualifying round Main Path.

As a result, the following changes to the access list was made: A Europa League place is vacated when a team qualifies for both the Champions League and the Europa League, or qualifies for the Europa League by more than one method.

When a place is vacated, it is redistributed within the national association by the following rules: The labels in the parentheses show how each team qualified for the place of its starting round: Notably one team that is not playing a national top division takes part in the competition; Vaduz representing Liechtenstein played in —18 Swiss Challenge League , which is Switzerland's 2nd tier.

The schedule of the competition is as follows all draws are held at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon , Switzerland, unless stated otherwise. Matches in the qualifying including preliminary and play-off and knockout rounds may also be played on Tuesdays or Wednesdays instead of the regular Thursdays due to scheduling conflicts.

From this season, the kick-off times starting from the group stage will be slightly changed to Kick-off times starting from the quarter-finals will be In the preliminary round, teams were divided into seeded and unseeded teams based on their UEFA club coefficients , [28] and then drawn into two-legged home-and-away ties.

Teams from the same association could not be drawn against each other. The draw for the preliminary round was held on 12 June In the qualifying and play-off rounds, teams are divided into seeded and unseeded teams based on their UEFA club coefficients for Main Path , [28] or based on which round they qualified from for Champions Path , and then drawn into two-legged home-and-away ties.

The draw for the first qualifying round was held on 20 June The second qualifying round is split into two separate sections: Champions Path for league champions and Main Path for cup winners and league non-champions.

The draw for the second qualifying round Champions Path was held on 19 June, [24] and the draw for the second qualifying round Main Path was held on 20 June The third qualifying round is split into two separate sections: The draw for the third qualifying round was held on 23 July The play-off round is split into two separate sections: The draw for the play-off round was held on 6 August The draw for the group stage was held on 31 August at the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco.

For the draw, the teams are seeded into four pots based on their UEFA club coefficients. In each group, teams play against each other home-and-away in a round-robin format.

The group winners and runners-up advance to the round of 32 where they are joined by the eight third-placed teams of the —19 UEFA Champions League group stage.

A total of 27 national associations are represented in the group stage. Teams are ranked according to points 3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss , and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings Regulations Articles In the knockout phase , teams play against each other over two legs on a home-and-away basis, except for the one-match final.

Ucl Final 2019 Video

UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE 2018/19 GROUP STAGE DRAW

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